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The Cornville area may be getting its own recreational trail system in the near future. Aside from Yavapai County Distrct 3 Supervisor Chip Davis and Assistant Public Works Director Mike Willett, another proponent of the project is Yavapai County District 2 Supervisor Tom Thurman, who said he believes trails are a good idea everywhere. Thurman’s district  expanded to the Cornville area after redistricing.The U.S. Forest Service is currently working on a project that would adopt several existing roads and trails and turn them into Forest Service system trails.

“We are currently undergoing an environmental assessment of a trails proposal that includes a historic wagon route and a few trailheads,” Forest Service Assistant Recreation Staff Officer Kevin Lehto said. “We anticipate a decision before the end of the year.”

The wagon route is one that historically ran from Cottonwood to Cornville, which is the ultimate goal of the trail system — to connect Cottonwood to Cornville and eventually to Sedona.

For the full story, see the Wednesday, March 13, edition of The Camp Verde Journal or the Cottonwood Journal Extra.

 

Despite the long history of arts in Sedona and the Verde Valley and the dozens of art galleries, the Verde Valley does not yet have an art museum. One group of artists plans to change that and has created momentum to make it happen soon.

Jerry Buley, Ph.D., left, John Warren Oakes and Sharron Vincent Porter show off one of the artworks they hope to have in the Sedona Art Museum, “Light and Shadows,” an oil painting on Masonite by Al Nestler, one of the first art teachers at the Sedona Art Center and on loan from the collection of Fran and Ed Elliott. The Sedona Art Museum is set to move into a preview museum at the Old Marketplace.The Sedona Art Museum, a recently created 501(c)(3) nonprofit, is set to move into a temporary location, or preview museum, at the Old Marketplace in West Sedona. Property owner John D. Miller has given the Sedona Art Museum Exploratory Committee two months to raise funds and renovate three vacant suites along the central courtyard, according to John Warren Oakes, chairman of the committee and a master signature artist charter member of the Sedona Area Guild of Artists. Miller has offered the group an incubation period of six months rent free with an option to renew, Oakes said. The museum group will still have to pay utilities and triple net fees — real estate taxes, building insurance and maintenance — which Oakes estimates at about $2,500 per month.

“I didn’t say it didn’t cost us anything. It’s rent-free but we have to pick up the utilities and operational expenses,” Oakes said. “That’s about the cost to open the doors.” This is not Oakes’ first foray into running an art museum. Oakes trained in arts administration at Harvard University, was an art professor at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green, Ky., for 46 years and was gallery director of the university art museum for 20 years. He worked as assistant dean at WKU’s College of Liberal Arts and Social Studies for 10 years, responsible for 13 departments and four buildings. Aside from the museum, he also ran a concert series.

For the full story, see the Wednesday, March 13, edition of The Camp Verde Journal or the Cottonwood Journal Extra.

 

Representatives of the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System, Arizona’s version of Medicaid, stopped in Camp Verde on March 5 as part of a tour around the state to talk to people about proposed changes to the health care plan and to listen to community input.

Monica Coury explains the impact of health care coverage at the Arizona Health Care  Cost Containment System community forum March 5 at Cliff Castle Casino Hotel in Camp Verde.More than 1.2 million people have been covered under the program since the 1990s, said Monica Coury, AHCCCS spokeswoman. The program is aimed at helping people with limited financial resources, not particular groups like the elderly or disabled. In July 2011, the state froze enrollment in the program for childless adults. Enrollment has dropped from around 220,000 to 82,000 due to attrition, Coury said.

Included in the numbers of those no longer covered are 18,000 cancer patients, Coury said. Childless adults that remain in the program can only be covered through 2013 unless something is done.

For the full story, see the Wednesday, March 13, edition of The Camp Verde Journal or the Cottonwood Journal Extra.

 

Arizona’s single largest day of giving is fast approaching.

From midnight to 11:59 p.m. on Wednesday, March 20, Arizona nonprofits who have signed on to the program encourage their supporters to go to the Arizona Gives Day website, find charities which fund causes they care about and make a year’s worth of tax-deductible donations in a single day.At least it’s what many nonprofits hope will be the largest day of giving in the year — Arizona Gives Day, a one-day push by charities and organizations to get their supporters to make some big donations, perhaps enough to keep the nonprofits in the black for the rest of the year.

From midnight to 11:59 p.m. on Wednesday, March 20, Arizona nonprofits who have signed on to the program encourage their supporters to go to the Arizona Gives Day website, find charities which fund causes they care about and make a year’s worth of tax-deductible donations in a single day.

For the full story, see the Wednesday, March 6, edition of The Camp Verde Journal or the Cottonwood Journal Extra.

 

Two candidates for Camp Verde Mayor discussed their positions in a forum sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Greater Verde Valley on Thursday, Feb. 28, at the Camp Verde Unified School District Multi-Use Complex.

Camp Verde Mayor Bob Burnside, left, and candidate Charles German share ideas and answer questions at the mayoral candidate forum at the Camp Verde Multi-Use Complex on Thursday, Feb. 28.Mayor Bob Burnside said he has enjoyed the experience and if re-elected, would be the first mayor elected three times to office since the town incorporated in 1986.

Charlie German, a former educator, school board member, local fire chief and member appointed to the Camp Verde Town Council, said he decided to run after many members of the community approached him asking him to run for the office.

For the full story, see the Wednesday, March 6, edition of The Camp Verde Journal.

After taking a year off, the Verde River Canoe Challenge is back with a new name. Now called the Verde River Runoff, the event is no longer organized by Northern Arizona University.

Pat Reider canoes down the Verde River near Beasley Flats on Sunday, March 3. In a few more weeks the Verde River will be filled with canoes and kayaks racing downriver from White Bridge to Beasley Flats as part of the Verde River Runoff.The challenge, schedule for Saturday, March 23, takes boaters of all skill levels on about a 10-mile journey from the White Bridge in Camp Verde downstream to Beasley Flats.

In 2010, the Verde River’s water level was running so high, organizers cancelled the river run due to safety concerns. In 2012, the event ended after NAU no longer continued sponsorship. There was still interest, however, and the event is back, with the help of the Verde River Valley Nature Organization, the Camp Verde Chamber of Commerce, the Salt River Project and the Nature Conservancy.

For the full story, see the Wednesday, March 6, edition of The Camp Verde Journal or the Cottonwood Journal Extra.

 

One of the many perks that comes with living in Sedona is the occasional opportunity to encounter the local wildlife, and if you’ve been out and about often enough on a hike or walking your dog, chances are you’ve seen a javelina or two.

A javelina is trapped between two fences in Uptown. A cornered javelina is a dangerous javelina, particularly if it is pregnant or with its young.Javelinas have been seen all over the greater Sedona area, from residential neighborhoods in the Village of Oak Creek to trails around West Sedona and even crossing the street near Uptown at night. While they may seem cute and harmless, it is important to remember that javelinas are wild animals and should be treated as such.

According to the Arizona Game and Fish Department, the months of January, February and March make up the javelina’s breeding season, and because the javelina — otherwise known as the collared peccary — will usually only attack when threatened or cornered. Expectant mother javelinas and their families should especially be avoided during this time.

For the full story, see the Wednesday, Feb. 27, edition of The Camp Verde Journal or the Cottonwood Journal Extra.

 

The University of Arizona College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Cooperative Extension has announced a new series of Beginning Farmer Workshops in Prescott for people looking to get started in growing their own fresh produce.

Farming at home is becoming more popular with some people even selling their yield at local farmers markets. Free workshops offered by the University of Arizona College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Cooperative Extension focus on the entire business of growing at home.The remaining two workshops are Tuesday, March 12, and Tuesday, March 26, from 8:30 a.m to 12:30 p.m. on the Prescott Rodeo Grounds at 840 Rodeo Drive, Unit No. C.

Master Gardener Jeff Schalau, director of U of A’s Yavapai County Cooperative Extension office, said there is growing interest in home farming, with folks wanting to grow their own food and even sell their crops at local farmers markets.

For the full story, see the Wednesday, Feb. 27, edition of The Camp Verde Journal or the Cottonwood Journal Extra.

 

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